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Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Archive for the 'Google Alerts' Category

‘How Google’s Ad Rank Changes Have Affected Ad Performance’ – ‘MarketingProfs’ Blog

The latest article on ‘MarketingProfs’ is titled “How Google’s Ad Rank Changes Have Affected Ad Performance”. Ayaz Nanji says, “Search ads with “extensions” have generally benefited from Google’s recent Ad Rank update, though overall paid search ad performance has declined, according to a recent analysis by The Search Agency. The Google update, unveiled on October 22, affects how the search engine determines the order of paid search ads. In addition to maximum bid and quality score, Ad Rank now includes a third variable: the expected impact of ad extensions. These... [...]

‘The Shape of Things to Come: Google in 2014’ – MOZ Blog

The latest MOZ blog post is titled “The Shape of Things to Come: Google in 2014”. Gianluca Fiorelli says, “How will Google evolve after the acquisition of Wavii, Behav.io, PostRank, Grapple, and machine learning and neural computing technologies? Gianluca Fiorelli paints a picture of Google in 2014, based on entity search, semantic, and über-personalization, covering how Google’s recent acquisitions will interact with one another in order to shape our search experience“. The Shape of Things to Come: Google in 2014 MOZ Blog  [...]

‘Google Reports 68% Spike in Government Censorship Request’ – ‘Mashable’

The latest post on ‘Mashable’ is titled “Google Reports 68% Spike in Government Censorship Request”. Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai says, “Governments around the world are trying to censor more online content than ever, according to Google‘s latest transparency report on government takedown requests.When compared to its last report, Google received 68% more requests to remove content in the first half of 2013. In total, the company received 3,846 requests to remove 24,737 pieces of content, but the company only accepted one-third of those requests“. Google Reports... [...]

‘What Email Marketers Are Saying About Gmail’s Image Serving Change’ – ‘Marketing Land’ Article

The latest article on  ‘Marketing Land’ is titled “What Email Marketers Are Saying About Gmail’s Image Serving Change”. Matt McGee says, “Google caused quite a stir Thursday with the news that it’sserving images in Gmail from its own servers, rather than from the sender’s servers. As we reported yesterday, Gmail open rates should become more accurate because images are displayed by default. But other data will go away — the user’s location and user agent, for example. The initial reaction was largely negative, but now that Google has clarified (a bit of)... [...]

‘How Google’s Change to Gmail Images Affects Email Marketers’ – HubSpot

The latest article on HubSpot blog is titled “How Google’s Change to Gmail Images Affects Email Marketers”. Dan Lyons says, “Yesterday Google announced that it is changing the way images are delivered to Gmail users. How big a deal is this? Some, like Ars Technica,say the new method will make life more difficult for email marketers. But others, including HubSpot’s own email experts, say it’s no big deal. Here’s what we know so far. In an Ars Technica article, reporter Ron Amadeo says Google is shutting down a tactic that helps email marketers gather... [...]

‘Google: Gmail Image Change May Improve Open Rate Data, But Will Strip Other User Data’ – ‘Marketing Land’ Article

The latest article on  ‘Marketing Land’ is titled “Google: Gmail Image Change May Improve Open Rate Data, But Will Strip Other User Data”. Matt McGee says, “With more information coming in this afternoon, it appears that Google’s image serving change in Gmail is a mixed bag (at best) for marketers. Google announced today that it’s going to start serving images sent to Gmail users from its own servers, not from the sender’s servers. This is starting today for desktop Gmail users, and will come to the Gmail mobile apps in the new year. Here’s what we know... [...]

‘What is Google likely to clamp down on in 2014?’ – ‘Econsultancy’ Blog

The latest ‘Econsultancy’ blog post is titled “What is Google likely to clamp down on in 2014?”. Graham Charlton says, “Google is seemingly involved in a never-ending battle to fight spam and underhand SEO tactics affecting its search results.  In 2013 we’ve had several updates and warnings, Hummingbirdbeing the most obvious, but what will Google target next? I have a few ideas on this, and I’ve also asked SEOs for their views on the areas where Google is likely to focus”. What is Google likely to clamp down on in 2014? ‘Econsultancy’... [...]

Download: Silverpop’s ‘Gmail Tabs: Impact on Email Marketing and Strategies to Respond’ eBook

Silverpop has released a free ebook titled “Gmail Tabs: Impact on Email Marketing and Strategies to Respond”. The Silverpop team says, “Since Google launched its new Gmail Tabs functionality in May 2013, much of the marketing world has been grabbing at quick-fix tactics unlikely to provide the desired short- or long-term results as new email inbox changes arise. Download our white paper and get a three-stage Gmail Tabs marketing plan designed to help you thrive in the age of Gmail Tabs – and beyond. You’ll learn: What the data says about how Gmail Tabs is impacting marketing How... [...]

‘Google’s Ad Rank update leads to improved performance of PPC ad extensions’ – ‘Econsultancy’ Blog

The latest ‘Econsultancy’ blog post is titled “Google’s Ad Rank update leads to improved performance of PPC ad extensions”. David Moth says, “A paid search algorithm update by Google has led to an improvement in the performance of PPC adverts that include an ad extension. But overall the new AdWords Ad Rank update actually caused a slight decline in ad performance. The update, which was announced back in October, altered the way that Google determines the order of paid search ads by adding in a third variable alongside the maximum bid and quality score”. Google’s... [...]

‘What are ‘nofollow’ tags and when should they be used in SEO?’ – ‘Econsultancy’ Blog

The latest ‘Econsultancy’ blog post is titled “What are ‘nofollow’ tags and when should they be used in SEO?”. David Moth says, “‘Nofollow’ tags are an HTML attribute that tells search engines not to pay any attention to links that appear on a webpage. It was created in 2005 by the major search engines as a way of combatting link spam and dodgy SEO practices, though its impact in helping to win that fight is debatable. Recently I’ve had a few conversations around the use of nofollow tags so thought it would be helpful to give an overview of why they’re... [...]